PREPARING YOUR RESUME

You want to apply for a job. Do you need a resume? That depends on
the kind of job you're applying for:

RESUME REQUIRED

 

RESUME SOMETIMES REQUIRED

RESUME NOT REQUIRED

Professional, technical, administrative and managerial jobs. Sales positions
Secretarial, clerical, and other office jobs

Skilled jobs (Examples: Baker, Hotel Clerk,
Electrician, Drafter, Welder)

Unskilled, quick turnover jobs (Examples: Fast Food Server, Laborers, Machine Loader, Cannery
Worker, etc.)


Tips for Good Resumes

You need two types of information to prepare your resume:

  1. Self information. You need to know your job talents, work history,
    education and career goals. Did you complete your background and
    experience list on page four? If you did, you have the self
    information required to prepare your resume.
  2. Job information. Gather specific information on the job you're
    applying for. Here's what you need:
  • Job duties (to match your skills to the skills needed for the job).
    Get your job duties from the job announcement. If the announcement
    or ad is vague, call the employer and ask for a description of job
    duties.
  • Education and experience required (again, so you can match your
    education and experience with that required for the job).
  • Hours and shifts usually worked.
  • Pay range (make their top offer the minimum acceptable!).
    With the information on yourself and the job you're applying for,
    you're ready to write your resume.

Two Types of Resumes:

  • Reverse chronological resumes list jobs you've had. Your most
    recent job is listed first, your job before that is listed second, and
    so on. Each job has employment dates and job duties.
  • Functional resumes describe your skills, abilities and
    accomplishments that relate to the job you're applying for. Employment
    history is less detailed than chronological resumes.

What kind of resume should you use?

Answer the following questions:

  • Have you progressed up a clearly defined career ladder, and you're
    looking for job advancement?
  • Do you have recent job experience at one or more companies?
    If your answer is yes, use a REVERSE CHRONOLOGICAL resume.
  • Are you a displaced homemaker?
  • Are you a veteran and you want to relate your military training to
    civilian jobs?
  • Do you have little or no job experience?
  • Do you have gaps in your work history?
  • Is the job you're applying for different from your present or
    recent job?
  • Do you want to emphasize your work skills and accomplishments
    instead of describing your job duties?

If your answer to any of these questions is yes, use a FUNCTIONAL
resume.

Tips for Preparing a Functional Resume:

  • Study the duties for the job you're applying for. Identify 2 or 3
    general skills that are important to the job.
  • Review your background and experience list. Find talents and
    accomplishments that demonstrate your ability to perform the job
    skills.
  • List your talents and accomplishments under the job skills they
    relate to.
  • Use simple, short, active sentences. This applicant is still in high school. He wants to work part time until he graduates.

Example of Functional Resumes

10 Tips for the Effective Resume

The following rules apply to all resumes:

  1. If possible, use a computer to prepare your resume. There are
    computer programs that make it easy to produce a professional
    looking resume. Your local school, library, Employment Service
    local office or "quick print" shop can help.
  2. Do not include irrelevant personal information (age, weight,
    height, marital status, etc.).
  3. Do not include salary and wages.
  4. Center or justify all headings. Don't use abbreviations.
  5. Be positive. Identify accomplishments.
  6. Use action verbs (see the list below).
  7. Be specific. Use concise sentences. Keep it short (one page is
    best).
  8. Make sure your resume "looks good" (neat and readable).
  9. Proofread the master copy carefully. Have someone else proofread
    the master copy carefully.
  10. Inspect photocopies for clarity, smudges and marks.

Action Verbs

Action verbs give your resume power and direction. Try to begin all
skills statements with an action verb. Here is a sample of action verbs
for different types of skills:

Management skills
administered
analyzed
coordinated
developed
directed
evaluated
improved
supervised

Technical skills
assembled
built
calculated
designed
operated
overhauled
remodeled
repaired

Clerical skills
arranged
catalogued
complied
generated
organized
processed
systematized

Creative skills
conceptualized
created
designed
established
fashioned
illustrated
invented
performed

Financial skills
administered
analyzed
balanced
budgeted
forecast
marketed
planned
projected

Helping skills
assessed
coached
counseled
diagnosed
facilitated
represented

Research Skills
clarified
evaluated
identified
inspected
organized
summarized

Communications skills
arranged
addressed
authored
drafted
formulated
persuade

Information from the U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration