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Glass half full

6/22/2014

There's always one or two people -- perhaps several thousand, in some cases -- who are willing to rock the boat, either for a good cause or for the simple case of seeing what will fly out of the cuckoo nest.

Hays is no exception. In most cases, you will find someone who is willing to take the opposite side to any argument.

As of today, there are many issues -- and rumors -- flying through the city streets about the lack of water, the loss of fireworks, the Hays USD 489 local option budget mail-in election, USD 489 personnel transactions, revitalizing the downtown, high housing prices, lack of "quality" eating establishments, Target's absence, lack of a Chipotle, storage containers and more.

There's a list of hot-button topics anywhere you look, or the possibility for something to turn into one.

It's enough to scare away some people if they don't have the stomach to handle the nonsensical talk, much of what turns out to be rumors more than truth at times.

We also know our community showcases some of the greatest things the state has to offer: Beautiful views of rising and setting suns, hard-working people, devoted volunteers, Gella's Diner and Lb. Brewing Co., a new Hobby Lobby, solid learning environments, visionary city leaders, quality businesses, etc.

Then last week, one more bit of good news came out: A handful of business are looking at the former Carlos O'Kelly's Mexican Cafe location.

True, the restaurant did close a few months ago, but it's a relatively quick turnaround for other businesses to be eyeing a landing spot in Hays.

"We've got about four restaurants looking for locations in Hays," Aaron White, executive director of the Ellis County Coalition for Economic Development, told The Hays Daily News.

Who wouldn't want a business located just off the main Interstate 70 exit in Hays -- if the price isn't too steep? It's one of the best locations to earn significant revenue.

White also noted businesses are looking at other venues in our fine city. That's reason for hope and optimism -- as long as White isn't misleading the community, which we have no reason to believe.

It's comforting to know people outside Hays are interested in investing in the community. It would be easy for some to hear the worries and cries from the public and turn tail and run.

Apparently, though, businesses want to be part of something extraordinary and a city with great potential for growth.

They look at Hays as a glass-half-full situation, and not the contrary.

In times when there is uncertainty -- whether imagined or real -- that's a good way to look at things.

Editorial by Nick Schwien

nschwien@dailynews.net

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