Last November, Gov. Sam Brownback ran for re-election. Immediately before the election, his opponents, Paul Davis and Jill Docking, were almost 10 points ahead of Brownback in all the polls.

During Election Day, while the votes were being cast, a statistical observer said the race was nearly evenly split all day, with a slim edge for Davis over Brownback when the voting booths closed.

However, after the polls closed and voting stopped, the voting machines acted strangely. A Topeka voting machine printed a surge of GOP votes for nearly two hours — all for Brownback, enough to re-elect him.

And, for the first time, Verizon wireless 3G sending units were in use, sending voting data to a centralized collection point. A technical observer rolled his eyes and mentioned to another technician: “What a simple but reliable way to throw an election.”

After the election, a Wichita State University aviation research chief statistician found “glaring oddities” in Brownback’s re-election voting pattern.

And Secretary of State Kris Kobach, Kansas’ self-appointed voter-fraud-expert, repeatedly refused to verify the vote count. He simply certified Brownback had won. Period. Thereafter, the ballots are not available.

Finally, several weeks after the election, Topeka’s press reported Brownback was the least popular governor in the nation, with the support of less than 30 percent of Kansas voters.

So, what do you think?

We still have three and a half years to file for impeachment?

Claude Lee,

Topeka