This is the time of year when people really notice crabgrass infestations. By far the best way to control crabgrass is to prevent it by maintaining a good, thick lawn.


Crabgrass is an annual that must come up from seed each year and the seed must have light in order to germinate. If a lawn is thick enough that sunlight does not reach the soil, the crabgrass will not germinate.


Under Kansas conditions it is not easy to maintain such a lawn; so many gardeners do the next best thing and apply a crabgrass preventer in the spring.


Crabgrass preventers kill the seed as it germinates. Most do not have any effect on crabgrass that has already come up. If we are too late to apply a preventer, we do have other herbicides that will kill crabgrass plants including Ortho Weed-B-Gon Max +Crabgrass Control, Fertilome Weed-Out with Crabgrass Control, Monterey Crab-E-Rad and BioAdvanced Lawn Weed & Crabgrass Killer.


Each contains quinclorac, which is a crabgrass herbicide, as well as other active ingredients that control broadleaf weeds.


Quinclorac is an excellent crabgrass killer that controls not only crabgrass, but also has good activity on foxtail and certain broadleaves such as field bindweed, black medic, and clover. However, it does little to nothing to goosegrass.


Fortunately, crabgrass starts declining about the middle of August. This is about the same time that cool- season grasses such as tall fescue and Kentucky bluegrass start to come out of their summer doldrums.


By the first of September, the crabgrass will be less noticeable. Therefore, a small infestation is best ignored. Remember that crabgrass is a warm-season annual and will be killed by the first frost.


Lauren Fick is the Horticulture Extension Agent for the Cottonwood Extension District. E-mail her at lfick@k-state.edu or phone at 785-628-9430 or 620-793-1910.