A couple of years ago, my wife and I gave each of our sons a necklace with a cross, a cross called The Jerusalem Cross. It was meant as a special gift. One of my sons wore it almost all of the time.


Last year, that son had some major changes in his life. He decided to leave his job of 10 years to return to school; move from his own private home to a dorm room; go from being around his friends, coworkers and family, to a place with thousands of strangers; from being financially comfortable, to having no income.


Big move.


A few months before he moved, he lost the necklace. August of last year, my wife and I moved him into the dorm room. We then left him, all alone. To say he was second guessing himself would be a great understatement.


He started classes and was overwhelmed by all the changes and challenges. He called his mother and I, saying, “I can’t do this.” We encouraged him, even pushed him, but he was riddled with self-doubt.


The school had given him a card. On it was the name of a clinic where students like him could call to seek counseling services. He was lying in his room on the bed the school had provided to him, when he began looking for that card, to seek help. He was desperate for it. He began feeling around the edge of the mattress next to the wall. Then he felt something strange. He was almost afraid it was going to be something gross. He pulled it out.


It was the cross on the necklace. It was still clasped together as if it had never been broken apart. He had no idea how it got there. Looking at it, holding it in his hand, he heard in his head (or perhaps his heart), “Josh, you’ve got this.” And he knew he was going to be fine.


We are all going through a very difficult time, because of the Covid-19 crisis. People are scared. People are stressed. People are angry. People are frustrated.


As in so many situations, people want to lash out; or they want to blame someone; or they think some are overreacting; or some are not taking enough precautions.


But the bottom line is, there is concern and fear.


As a Kansan, I have been so impressed with the steps that our officials have taken, from the city, the county and certainly the state. But I’ve been even more impressed with the steps that people individually have taken. We’re lucky that we have so many people that are trying so hard to contain the virus.


I think in some ways it’s kind of like my son: there are so many changes happening at one time that we fear we just will not be able to make it. But like my son, when he was holding that necklace and cross in his hand, we’ve got this.


At this difficult time, stay vigilant; take care of yourselves; take care of each other; but remember, “We’ve got this.” Trust your heart.


Randy Clinkscales is an elder care attorney in Hays at Clinkscales Elder Law Practice P.A., 718 Main.