Should anyone be surprised at the multilayered pushback at Trump's presidency by stalwart Republicans, like those comprising the Lincoln Project?


Take the example of Stuart Stevens, who was for twenty-five years a Republican consultant and head strategist for several tough media campaigns, representing high-profile politicians. In his candid book, "It Was All a Lie: How the Republican Party Became Donald Trump," he offers this observation: "Donald Trump didn't crash the guardrails of political and civil standards; rather, the highway officials eagerly removed the guardrails and stood by cheering as the lunatic behind the wheel drove the party straight off the cliff of reason."


From my personal perspective, Trump is not a Republican. He is what I call a "know-it-allic" and a "factophobe", who resorts constantly to "escapegoating." He has interest only in himself and will vilify anyone who disparages his name with facts by countering loudly and proudly (often over the whir of helicopter blades) with rebuttals of fake.


We had better refocus quickly and see through his reckless rewriting of a world reality that could, literally and figuratively, blow up in our faces--all of us, not a chosen few who almost worship the man with a loud hallelujah and an amen.


What we see now are steely and rancorous politicians, who race up and down the aisles blindfolded, crashing into each other and whining like big babies.


To borrow a coinage from a friend, we might benefit more from ethical "libercons,," that is, politicians who speak beyond empty slogans and actually solve the problems of people who desperately need to be seen, heard and helped, not talked down to by a man who has lived a lifetime in a hyperbolic chamber.


And so back to Trump a fake Republican. Again, Stuart Stevens highlights his fakery as well as anyone: "Republicans are allowing Trump to equate conservatism with conspiracy, and the long-term success as predicated on stupidity becoming an airborne viral plague that will sweep the country like the walking dead."


With several interconnected crises staring us down, we had better vote beyond one or two issues or risk our democracy succumbing to a leviathan with an insatiable appetite for everything that increases the menacing imbalances between humanity and the planet.


America cannot withstand a proud, rambling man who preys on anyone ignorant enough to, as recent campaign rallies attest, love him.


Even his niece, Mary Trump, refers to him in her recent book "as a petty, pathetic little man--ignorant, incapable, out of his depth, and lost in his own delusional spin."


Lastly, all of us need to reeducate ourselves and to relearn how hard it is to keep a democracy, even in the best of times. But these are the worst of times. Vote for, admittedly, a gradual return to a real democracy and a real president--now and in the future.


Richard Joel Holmes


Hays